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Posts Tagged ‘speaks for itself’

Trumpy Libations

This is not quite the Trump Vodka of yore, but it is quite Trumpy nonetheless. Don’t you think so?

The whiskey on the left is America First Whiskey, approved for a DSP in San Marcos, California. I believe I see some sharks and monster trucks to go along with the tanks, jets, and deltoids. I found a discussion about the goals for this label, and it appears that the designer nailed it:  “We want people who love Donald Trump and the idea of “Make America Great Again” to look at this logo and say ‘Hell yes! That’s the whiskey I want!'” They also considered throwing in some fanny packs, and a T-Rex — but perhaps that would go too far. The bottler proclaimed:  “We’re [making a whiskey for Americans]  interested in Freedom, beards, rifles, explosions, The US Constitution, military/veterans, and reflecting on how badass Donald Trump is.”

The wine, on the right, is branded as Make America Grape Again, American Red Wine. It is bottled by Azari Winery of Petaluma, California.

And then there is Covfefe, with no less than six related label approvals:

  1. Artisanal Covfefe Stout
  2. Imperialist Pig Covfefe Stout
  3. Covfefe Merlot
  4. Covfefe Red
  5. Saugatuck Covfefe Ale
  6. ………………….and…………………………..the first one out of the gate is Surly Covfefe Beer (approved June 7, 2017, just a few days after the infamous tweet of May 31, 2017)

In addition, there are no less than 38 trademark applications including the term COVFEFE.

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Posted in:

vodka, wine


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Quick, Name an Australian Beer(?)

aus

Who did not see this coming but should have? Hey Christopherson, who says beer and wine are closely related/un-related for trademark purposes? Hey Messinger thanks for telling me about this.

It is common knowledge that the beer field is crowded, when it comes to trademarks. But many steps further, even the beer-fish-trademark field is crowded, it appears.

  1. Dogfish
  2. Ballast Point Yellowtail
  3. Sculpin
  4. Roosterfish
  5. Shark Attack

And so on. NPR noted:

American trademark law lumps breweries together with wineries and distilleries, making the naming game even chancier. A widely circulating rumor has it that Yellow Tail Wines, of Australia, came after Ballast Point Brewing Co., in San Diego, for naming a beer “Yellowtail.” Ballast Point’s pale ale is now conspicuously lacking a fish-themed name (a signature, if not a trademark, of the brewery), though an image of a brightly colored yellowtail still resides plainly — and legally, it seems — on the label. A spokesperson for Ballast Point said the company could not discuss the matter.

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malt beverage


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The Sweetest Shine

sugar

This may be the very label for which the “speaks for itself” tag was invented.

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alcohol beverages generally


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Cocktail Caviar: Pearl Size Can Make All the Difference

cccav

Here is an innovative new spirits product called Cocktail Caviar. It is “burst-able pearls of naturally flavored spirits.” You can toss them in some wine, or freeze them and add them to other drinks. The product is so new that there is not much about this product on the web so far.

If I understand correctly, these chickpea sized “pearls” are a giantized version of the tiny booze droplets that make up Palcohol. Here, the alcohol is encapsulated in a layer of kelp and so it not quite a liquid and not quite a solid. Maybe there is shock fatigue after the Palcohol surprise, or the size of the pearls makes an enormous difference, or it’s the upscale marketing — but it does not seem like this product is bound to raise hackles the way the powderized product has. Steven Hollenkamp, the man behind this product, explained that part of the appeal of the brand name is that “caviar” is not at all likely to appeal to minors.

I happened to meet Steven this week and he explained:

We worked diligently with TTB getting Cocktail Caviar approved. This included 240 emails, dozens of phone calls and several in-person meetings with TTB administrators, one of which was a lengthy sit down meeting with several high-ups at TTB Headquarters in DC. They were on top of it and met me half way. As a novel product, we felt being an open-book in terms of information and documents, as well as with the long term Cocktail Caviar vision, was the best way to cultivate a healthy long term relationship with TTB. I mean that, and while that may seem like a simple idea, you’d be surprised how many brands use a more guarded approach, trying to snake through the rules in a way that can only irritate TTB formula and COLA specialists.

TTB approved seven flavors of this product last month, and one of the approvals is here.

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Posted in:

alcohol beverages generally, distilled spirits specialty


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Scrapple Flavored Vodka

scrapple

I am a tad late for April Fools Day but it’s one of my favorite national holidays and so, we present the above. Is it real or fake? Would you drink it?


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


No cheating or Googling allowed. A very good clue, and/or the answer, is here.

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alcohol beverages generally


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